SYMPTOMS OF EMPHYSEMA - Emphysema Symptoms
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SYMPTOMS OF EMPHYSEMA


 Shortness of breath is the most common symptom of emphysema. Cough, sometimes caused by the production of mucus, and wheezing may also be symptoms of emphysema. You may notice that your tolerance for exercise decreases over time. Emphysema usually develops slowly. You may not have any acute episodes of shortness of breath. Slow deterioration is the rule, and it may go unnoticed. This is especially the case if you are a smoker or have other medical problems that limit your ability to exercise.

 One of the hallmark signs of emphysema is "purse-lipped breathing." The person with emphysema is struggling to exhale completely, with airways that close when the chest wall collapses during expiration. They purse the lips, leaving only a small opening. Then, when they exhale, the lips block the flow of air, increasing pressure in the collapsed airways, and opening them, allowing the person to fully exhale.

 People with emphysema may develop a "barrel chest," where the distance from the chest to the back, which is normally less than the distance side to side, becomes more pronounced. This is a direct result of air becoming trapped behind obstructed airways.



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