ASTHMA - When to Seek Medical Care
Home Eyes EARS MOUTH NOSE SKIN

Respiratory system
Respiratory Diseases
Type and Definition of Asthma Asthma Causes Asthma Symptoms Treatments Asthma Prevention Asthma Exams and Tests - Asthma Attack Asthma in Adults Signs and symptoms - Occupational Asthma Parents and Asthma Seniors and Asthma Triggers for Asthma When to Seek Medical Care

Lung Cancer Type and Definition Lung Cancer Causes Lung Cancer Symptoms Lung Cancer Treatment Lung Cancer Surgery Lung Cancer Prognosis Lung Cancer Prevention
Laryngeal Cancer Type and Definition Laryngeal Cancer Diagnosis Laryngeal Cancer Causes and Symptoms Laryngeal Cancer Staging Laryngeal Cancer Treatment Alternative Treatment Laryngeal Cancer Laryngeal Cancer Prognosis
Bronchal Adenoma Bronchial Adenoma Symptoms Bronchial Adenoma Treatment
Type of Bronchitis Bronchitis Causes Bronchitis Symptoms Bronchitis Treatment
Aspergillosis Bronchiectasis Byssinosis Cough Hantaviruses Hay Fever Laryngitis Nasal Polyps Respiratory Failure
Type of Emphysema Emphysema Causes Emphysema Symptoms Emphysema Treatment Emphysema Prevention Emphysema Surgery
Pneumonia Viral Pneumonia Bacterial Pneumonia Other Types of Pneumonia Pneumonia Diagnosis and treatment
Tuberculosis: Type and Definition Causes Tuberculosis Symptoms Tuberculosis Treatment Tuberculosis Prevention Tuberculosis
Circulatory system Digestive system Endocrine system



ASTHMA


 If you think you or your child may have asthma, make an appointment with your health care provider. Some clues pointing to asthma include the following:

 Wheezing

 Difficulty breathing

 Pain or tightness in your chest

 Recurrent, spasmodic cough that is worse at night
 If you or your child has asthma, you should have an action plan worked out in advance with your health care provider. This plan should include instructions on what to do when an asthma attack occurs, when to call the health care provider, and when to go to a hospital emergency department.

 Take 2 puffs of an inhaled beta-agonist (a rescue medication), with 1 minute between puffs. If there is no relief, take an additional puff of inhaled beta-agonist every 5 minutes. If there is no response after 8 puffs, which is 40 minutes, your health care provider should be called.

 Your provider also should be called if you have an asthma attack when you are already taking oral or inhaled steroids or if your inhaler treatments are not lasting 4 hours.

 These are general guidelines only. If your provider recommends another plan for you, follow that plan. Although asthma is a reversible disease, and treatments are available, people can die from a severe asthma attack.

 If you are having an asthma attack and have severe shortness of breath or are unable to reach your health care provider in a short period of time, you must go to the nearest hospital emergency department.

 Do not drive yourself to the hospital. Have a friend or family member drive. If you are alone, call 911 immediately for emergency medical transport.



auuuu.org ©2016.