Heart Anatomy: Types of valves regulate blood flow through your Heart, Pump Blood

Heart Anatomy
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Heart Anatomy: Types of valves regulate blood flow through your Heart



Heart Anatomy: Types of valves regulate blood flow through your Heart, pump blood

 The essential function of the heart is to pump blood to various parts of the body. The mammalian heart has four chambers: right and left atria and right and left ventricles. The two atria act as collecting reservoirs for blood returning to the heart while the two ventricles act as pumps to eject the blood to the body. As in any pumping system, the heart comes complete with valves to prevent the back flow of blood. Deoxygenated blood returns to the heart via the major veins (superior and inferior vena cava), enters the right atrium, passes into the right ventricle, and from there is ejected to the pulmonary artery on the way to the lungs. Oxygenated blood returning from the lungs enters the left atrium via the pulmonary veins, passes into the left ventricle, and is then ejected to the aorta. In the frontal view of the heart shown below, the right atrium is in blue, the left atrium in yellow, the right ventricle in purple, and the left ventricle in red. The chambers are semi-transparent so that the valves, drawn in white, can be seen.

 The heart weighs between 7 and 15 ounces (200 to 425 grams) and is a little larger than the size of your fist. By the end of a long life, a person's heart may have beat (expanded and contracted) more than 3.5 billion times. In fact, each day, the average heart beats 100,000 times, pumping about 2,000 gallons (7,571 liters) of blood.

 Your heart is located between your lungs in the middle of your chest, behind and slightly to the left of your breastbone (sternum). A double-layered membrane called the pericardium surrounds your heart like a sac. The outer layer of the pericardium surrounds the roots of your heart's major blood vessels and is attached by ligaments to your spinal column, diaphragm, and other parts of your body. The inner layer of the pericardium is attached to the heart muscle. A coating of fluid separates the two layers of membrane, letting the heart move as it beats, yet still be attached to your body.

 Your heart has 4 chambers. The upper chambers are called the left and right atria, and the lower chambers are called the left and right ventricles. A wall of muscle called the septum separates the left and right atria and the left and right ventricles. The left ventricle is the largest and strongest chamber in your heart. The left ventricle's chamber walls are only about a half-inch thick, but they have enough force to push blood through the aortic valve and into your body.

 Four types of valves regulate blood flow through your heart:

The tricuspid valve regulates blood flow between the right atrium and right ventricle.

 The pulmonary valve controls blood flow from the right ventricle into the pulmonary arteries, which carry blood to your lungs to pick up oxygen.

 The mitral valve lets oxygen-rich blood from your lungs pass from the left atrium into the left ventricle.

 The aortic valve opens the way for oxygen-rich blood to pass from the left ventricle into the aorta, your body's largest artery, where it is delivered to the rest of your body.



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