CIRCULATORY SYSTEM: Human Cardiovascular System

CIRCULATORY SYSTEM: Human Cardiovascular System
Home Eyes EARS MOUTH NOSE SKIN

Circulatory System
COMPONENTS OF THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM OPERATION AND FUNCTION Systemic Circulation Pulmonary Circulation Additional Functions Blood Pressure

HEART Anatomy Arrhythmias Cardiac Cycle Cardiac Output Congenital Heart Defect Control Of The Heart Rate Coronary Arteries Coronary Heart Disease Diseases Of The Heart Endocardium Function Of The Heart Generation Of The Heartbeat Heart Failure Heart Valves History Of Heart Research Myocardium Pericardium Heart Structure Heart Valve Malfunction Other Forms of Heart Disease
Blood INTRODUCTION ROLE OF BLOOD COMPOSITION OF BLOOD Plasma Red Blood Cells Blood Type White Blood Cells Platelets and Clotting PRODUCTION AND ELIMINATION OF BLOOD CELLS Red Blood Cell Diseases White Blood Cell Diseases Coagulation Diseases BLOOD BANKS Blood Transfusion Blood Count Blood donation and registry Blood gas analysis Blood sugar tests Blood typing and crossmatching Blood urea nitrogen test Blood-viscosity reducing drugs Blood Culture Blood Clot in the Legs Causes Blood Clot in the Legs Symptoms Blood Clot in the Legs
Digestive system Esophagus Gall bladder Large intestine Lips, cheeks and palate Salivary glands Serous membranes Small intestine Stomach Tunics
Teeth Tongue Digestive Process in Mouth Sleep Right Mouth Guard
LIVER LIVER DISEASES FUNCTIONS OF THE LIVER STRUCTURE OF THE LIVER
Respiratory system
Endocrine system Glandular Structure Gonads Hormones Pancreas Parathyroid Glands Pineal Gland Pituitary Gland Pituitary Hormones Thymus Thyroid Gland



CIRCULATORY SYSTEM



CIRCULATORY SYSTEM: Human Cardiovascular System

 Circulatory System, or cardiovascular system, in humans, the combined function of the heart, blood, and blood vessels to transport oxygen and nutrients to organs and tissues throughout the body and carry away waste products. Among its vital functions, the circulatory system increases the flow of blood to meet increased energy demands during exercise and regulates body temperature. In addition, when foreign substances or organisms invade the body, the circulatory system swiftly conveys disease-fighting elements of the immune system, such as white blood cells and antibodies, to regions under attack. Also, in the case of injury or bleeding, the circulatory system sends clotting cells and proteins to the affected site, which quickly stop bleeding and promote healing.

 The one-way circulatory system carries blood to all parts of your body. This process of blood flow within your body is called circulation. Arteries carry oxygen-rich blood away from your heart, and veins carry oxygen-poor blood back to your heart.

 In pulmonary circulation, though, the roles are switched. It is the pulmonary artery that brings oxygen-poor blood into your lungs and the pulmonary vein that brings oxygen-rich blood back to your heart.

 In the diagram, the vessels that carry oxygen-rich blood are colored red, and the vessels that carry oxygen-poor blood are colored blue.

 Twenty major arteries make a path through your tissues, where they branch into smaller vessels called arterioles. Arterioles further branch into capillaries, the true deliverers of oxygen and nutrients to your cells. Most capillaries are thinner than a hair. In fact, many are so tiny, only one blood cell can move through them at a time. Once the capillaries deliver oxygen and nutrients and pick up carbon dioxide and other waste, they move the blood back through wider vessels called venules. Venules eventually join to form veins, which deliver the blood back to your heart to pick up oxygen.



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